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    I Shall Bear Witness: The Diaries of Victor Klemperer 1933-41

    £14.99

    A publishing sensation, the publication of Victor Klemperer's diaries brings to light one of the most extraordinary documents of the Nazi period.
    'A classic ... Klemperer's diary deserves to rank alongside that of Anne Frank's' SUNDAY TIMES

    ISBN: 9781474623179
    AuthorKlemperer, Victor
    PublisherNameOrion Publishing Co
    Pub Date28/10/2021
    BindingPaperback
    Pages688
    Availability: In Stock

    A publishing sensation, the publication of Victor Klemperer's diaries brings to light one of the most extraordinary documents of the Nazi period.

    'A classic ... Klemperer's diary deserves to rank alongside that of Anne Frank's' SUNDAY TIMES

    'I can't remember when I read a more engrossing book' Antonia Fraser

    'Not dissimilar in its cumulative power to Primo Levi's, is a devastating account of man's inhumanity to man' LITERARY REVIEW

    The son of a rabbi, Klemperer was by 1933 a professor of languages at Dresden. Over the next decade he, like other German Jews, lost his job, his house and many of his friends.

    Klemperer remained loyal to his country, determined not to emigrate, and convinced that each successive Nazi act against the Jews must be the last. Saved for much of the war from the Holocaust by his marriage to a gentile, he was able to escape in the aftermath of the Allied bombing of Dresden and survived the remaining months of the war in hiding. Throughout, Klemperer kept a diary. Shocking and moving by turns, it is a remarkable and important account.

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    A publishing sensation, the publication of Victor Klemperer's diaries brings to light one of the most extraordinary documents of the Nazi period.

    'A classic ... Klemperer's diary deserves to rank alongside that of Anne Frank's' SUNDAY TIMES

    'I can't remember when I read a more engrossing book' Antonia Fraser

    'Not dissimilar in its cumulative power to Primo Levi's, is a devastating account of man's inhumanity to man' LITERARY REVIEW

    The son of a rabbi, Klemperer was by 1933 a professor of languages at Dresden. Over the next decade he, like other German Jews, lost his job, his house and many of his friends.

    Klemperer remained loyal to his country, determined not to emigrate, and convinced that each successive Nazi act against the Jews must be the last. Saved for much of the war from the Holocaust by his marriage to a gentile, he was able to escape in the aftermath of the Allied bombing of Dresden and survived the remaining months of the war in hiding. Throughout, Klemperer kept a diary. Shocking and moving by turns, it is a remarkable and important account.